1. g3 g6 2. Bg2 Bg7 3. c4 d6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. d4 O-O 6. O-O Nc6 7. Nc3 Bd7 8. h3 Qc8 9. Kh2 e5 10. dxe5 dxe5

11. Nd5 Nxd5?

White's threat was 12. Nxe5 Nxd5 (12...Nxe5? 13. Ne7+ and 14. Nxc8) 13. Nxd7 winning a pawn. But 11...Rfe8 would have avoided the compromising of Black's queenside pawns which soon follows and has a lasting impact on the game.

12. cxd5 Nd4 13. Nxd4 exd4 14. Bf4 c5 15. dxc6 Bxc6 16. Rc1 Qe6 17. Bxc6 bxc6 18. b3 Rfe8

All per White's plan, but Black's pressure on the e-file and central space advantage inhibit White from exploiting his opponent's broken queenside pawns.

19. e3!!

The following exchanges neutralize Black's pressure, allowing White to focus on the weak enemy pawns.

19...Rad8 20. exd4 Rxd4 21. Re1! Rxd1 22. Rxe6 Rxe6 23. Rxd1

23...Kf8

Key to White's concept at move nineteen, is that 23...Re2 is refuted by 24. Rd8+ Bf8 25. Bh6.

24. Be3 a5 25. Rd8+ Ke7 26. Ra8 Bc3 27. Kg2

White uses the lull to bring his king closer to the action.

27...Kd6 28. Ra7 Rf6 29. Kf1 h5 30. Bh6

Threatening 31. Bg7 Rf3 32. Ke2! winning the exchange.

30...Bd4

30...Rxf2+? 31. Kxf2 Bd4+ loses to 32. Be3. But now White achieves simplification to a winning king and pawn ending.

31. Bf8+ Ke6 32. Re7+ Kd5

32...Kf5 33. Bg7 Rd6 34. Bxd4 Rxd4 35. Rxf7+ should win.

33. Rd7+ Ke4 34. Rxd4+! Kxd4 35. Bg7 Ke5 36. Ke2 Ke6 37. Bxf6 Kxf6 38. Kd3 Ke5 39. Kc4

39...Ke4

39...Kd6 40. a4! with the threat 41. b4 axb4 42. Kxb4 Kd5 43. a5 c5+ 44. Kb5 c4 45. a6 and White queens first with check. 39...Kd6 40. a4 c5 would permit 41. Kb5 and Kxa5.

40. a4 Kf3 41. b4 axb4 42. a5 Kxf2 43. a6 Kxg3 44. a7 Kxh3 45. a8(Q) and Black soon resigned